A conversation with ex illuminati insider Ronald Bernard and Sacha Stone

 

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Watch Korean Central TV Video of Unofficial visit of Supreme Leader Kim Jong Un in China.

via Watch Korean Central TV Video of Unofficial visit of Supreme Leader Kim Jong Un in China.

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Watch Korean Central TV Video of Unofficial visit of Supreme Leader Kim Jong Un in China.

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N.Korea: Kim Jong Un Reinstates Female ‘Pleasure Squads’ for Sexual Service

North Korean leader Kim Jong-un is reportedly following in the creepy footsteps of his father by founding a “pleasure squad” of young women to demonstrate his “sexual power.” –  TheDailyDot

South Korea’s Chosun Ilbo newspaper reported that the group, called Gippeumjo, was disbanded following the 2011 death of Kim’s father, Kim Jong-il, and sent to work at summer villas owned by the Kim family.

The younger Kim apparently developed a taste for the group’s talents while being treated for gout last year.

The women, who were reportedly handpicked by Kim’s advisors, are currently undergoing security training at a hotel in the capital city of Pyongyang.

While the practice of keeping sex slaves has never officially been confirmed, like most of the secretive state’s other outrageous oddities, many defectors have testified to its existence.

Lee Il-nam, who attended private school with Kim in Geneva, said that the “satisfaction team” traditionally serviced not only the nation’s ruler, but also the senior leadership circle.

The girls retire at the age of 25 and sign a pledge of secrecy, apparently in their own blood, “in return for money and gifts.”

It’s unclear how Kim’s wife Ri Sol-ju, who gave birth to his daughter in 2010, feels about the idea.

In 2010, Marie Claire published the harrowing account of a 15-year-old girl who was “recruited” into one such group while Kim’s father was still in power.

“Refusal was not an option,” the article said. “Any attempt at dissent, or to defect, was an offence punishable by death.”

Once chosen, the new recruits undertake a rigorous training regimen. For six months, each young woman is assigned to one of Kim Jong-il’s many luxurious villas and palaces around the country – including his lavish secret lair underneath Mount Baekdusan on the border with China.

Many pleasure squad ingenues are sent overseas to perfect their song, dance and massage skills and then typically, if they are chosen by Kim Jong-il for full admittance into the cadre, are required to sign a pledge of allegiance in their own blood. They are then inducted into one of the teams.

“This has been going on under three generations of the Kim family ruling North Korea,” Professor Toshimitsu Shigemura of Tokyo’s Waseda University told the Telegraph, “and it has become a tradition that is also a demonstration of the leader’s power over his people and his sexual power.”

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North Korea reported to have destroyed nuclear testing facility at Punggye-ri

In public spectacle for international press, DPRK said to have decommissioned major nuke test site

 

via North Korea reported to have destroyed nuclear testing facility at Punggye-ri

 

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North Korea reported to have destroyed nuclear testing facility at Punggye-ri

Dagyum Ji and Oliver Hotham 

North Korea on Thursday dismantled its nuclear testing site at Punggye-ri, the Associated Press reported, in a public event attended by 30 international journalists.

Further details on the demolition are expected in the next few hours, with initial reports from South Korean press pool members who attended the event saying its decommissioning began at 1100 and continued until 1617 local time.

“North Korea destroyed at least three nuclear tunnels, observation buildings, a metal foundry and living quarters at its Punggye-ri nuclear test site,” CNN reported with a Punggye-ri byline.

“Before the explosions, the journalists said they were invited to view the explosives rigged in the tunnels, before moving a safe distance away to witness their detonation,” the report added.

It remains unclear whether DPRK leader Kim Jong Un attended the event.

A press delegation featuring journalists from AP, CNN, CBS, Sky News, RT, and others departed from Beijing Capital Airport on Tuesday to witness the site’s demolition.

The following day saw eight reporters from South Korea’s News 1 and MBC join them – following days of uncertainty on whether Pyongyang would grant ROK press access to the event.

The South Korean reporters departed from Seoul Air Base around midday on Wednesday, taking a chartered flight direct to Wonsan – the second such flight this year.

A group of reporters reportedly left a hotel at around 1800 local time yesterday and headed to Wonsan Station, with their train believed to depart for the nuclear test site around an hour later.

North Korea first announced it would dismantle its “nuclear test site in the country’s northern side” following a meeting of the country’s ruling party in late April.

That plan was later confirmed by South Korean President Moon Jae-in during talks with Kim Jong Un on April 27, during which the DPRK leader reportedly said he would invite international press and experts to the event.

“To disclose it to the international community in a transparent manner, [Kim] unveiled [the plan] to invite South Korean and U.S. experts and journalists to North Korea,” a senior official at the ROK presidential office said at the time.

The DPRK Ministry of Foreign Affairs earlier this month said Pyongyang would invite international journalists to witness the dismantling of its northern nuclear test ground, without making any mention of the attendance of experts.

No experts were reportedly in attendance on Thursday – a move which will likely raise questions about the verifiability of the site’s destruction.

Executive Director of the Arms Control Association Daryl G. Kimball on Thursday welcomed the move, though said having press at the event was “not sufficient to ensure nuclear testing won’t occur again.”

Monitoring by Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CBTO) and North Korean ratification of the CBT were “logical next steps,” he added.

Thursday’s event has drawn parallels with the DPRK’s 2008 demolition of the cooling tower of the Yongbyon nuclear complex, during which officials from the U.S. State Department and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) watched the blast from the stand around one km away from the cooling tower.

Punggye-ri nuclear test ground in Kilju County, North Hamgyong Province

Punggye-ri — until Thursday the world’s only known active nuclear test site — has been the location of all six of North Korea’s nuclear tests since the country’s first in October 2006.

The country tested further nuclear devices in May 2009, February 2013, and January and September 2016.

The northern nuclear test ground is reportedly comprised of four tunnels, with the east portal believed to be where the North conducted its 2006 test. It is believed to be no longer usable.

The DPRK’s five subsequent nuclear tests are believed to have been conducted at the north portal, while the other two have never been used.

The country’s most recent test was in September last year, when the North claimed that it “successfully carried out” the test of a hydrogen bomb that could be placed on an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM).

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un two months later declared the completion of his country’s state nuclear force.

One long-time North Korea watcher said the demolition of the test site was largely a symbolic exercise to build trust ahead of a planned DPRK-U.S. summit next month.

“It’s good as both a confidence-building measure and a piece of good political theater,” Andrei Lankov, director of the Korea Risk Group – which owns and operates NK News – said.

“The real significance is somewhat doubtful because the nuclear test site is not a particularly important part of their nuclear weapons development structure. If necessary, it could be relatively easily and cheaply built anew in a different place,” he continued.

“But it was meant to be a goodwill gesture and a signal which will also make a good TV picture, which is very important nowadays.”

The South Korean Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MOFA) on Thursday said that the dismantlement of the nuclear test ground would the North’s “first measure” towards denuclearization.

“We are expecting that the action can serve as the opportunity for the complete denuclearization,” ministry spokesperson Noh Kyu-duk said at a regular news briefing.

Noh said Seoul believes there will be the discussion on follow-up measures to be taken by international organizations, including the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency).

A press officer at the Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA) told NK News that the agency had not detected any seismic waves as of 1520 local time on Thursday, adding that they weren’t sure seismic waves caused by the dismantlement of the nuclear test ground were strong enough to be detected.

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N.Korea: Channeling Foreign Information Technology, Information to Regime Goals

Office of the National Counterintelligence Executive: December 2003 Archives

Pyongyang is working with Koreans abroad and other foreign partners in information
technology (IT) ventures, sending software developers overseas for exposure to international trends, granting scientists access to foreign data, and developing new sources of overseas information in a bid to develop the economy. Cellular telephones and Web pages are accessible to some North Koreans, while foreigners in Pyongyang have access to foreign television news and an Internet café. While such steps are opening windows on the world, however, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) officials are largely limiting such exposure to areas required for economic development. Moreover, they are applying IT tools to develop new means of indoctrinating the public in North Korea and reaching audiences overseas.

 Working With Foreign Partners in IT Ventures North Korea is promoting cooperative ventures with foreign partners to develop IT, which DPRK media have repeatedly described as a priority area in science and technology.

An editorial in the 10 November 2003 issue of the party newspaper Nodong Sinmun, for example, named IT as the first of three technical fields, along with nanotechnology and bio-engineering, to which “primary efforts should be directed.”

North Korean media suggest that officials have grasped the potential of leveraging IT for national development. A recent article in the government’s newspaper asserted that

(1) “IT trade surpasses the automobile and crude oil industries” and

(2) “IT goods are more favorable in developing countries than they are in the developed nations” (Minju Choson, 7 March).

ROK analysts, such as those who compiled a survey of Pyongyang’s IT industry (Puhkan-ui IT Hyonhwang-mit Nambuk Kyoryu Hyomnyok Pangan, 1 January), have suggested that DPRK policies for promoting a domestic IT industry reflect the nation’s lack of capital, dearth of natural resources, and relative abundance of technical talent.

Hoonnet.com CEO Kim Pom-hun, whose extensive experience in North Korea includes residence in Pyongyang from December 2001 to October 2002, has assessed North Korean IT manpower as resembling “an open mine with the world’s best reserves of high-quality ore” (Wolgan Choson, 1 January).

Pyongyang is partnering with Koreans in South Korea, Japan, and China, as well as Chinese, in ventures to develop both software and hardware, including:

• The Morning-Panda Joint Venture Company in Pyongyang, a partnership between North Korea’s Electronic Products Development Company and China’s Panda Electronic Group, which began making computers in late 2002.

• The Pyongyang Informatics Center (PIC) and South Korea’s Pohang University of Science and Technology (PUST), which are cooperating to develop virtual reality technology. In addition:

• The ROK’s Hanabiz.com and PIC launched the Hana Program Center in Dandong, China, in August 2001 (http://hanabiz.com/history.html) for joint software development and training of DPRK programmers.

• IMRI—ROK manufacturer of computer peripherals—and CGS—a Tokyo-based software company affiliated with the pro-Pyongyang General Association of Korean Residents in Japan (GAKRJ, a.k.a. Chosen Soren)—joined hands in July 2000 to form UNIKOTECH (Unification of Korea Technologies) to develop and market software. Both partners maintain links to North Korean IT enterprises.

• The ROK’s Samsung Electronics and the DPRK’s Korea Computer Center (KCC) have been developing software together at a Samsung research center in Beijing since March 2000 (Chonja Sinmun, 15 October). Venturing Overseas To acquire information on foreign IT trends and to promote their domestic industry, North Koreans have begun venturing overseas in recent years.

• State Software Industry General Bureau Director Han U-ch’ol led a DPRK delegation in late September 2003 to the China International Software and Information Service Fair in Dalian. The North Koreans joined specialists from China and South Korea in describing conditions in their respective IT industries and calling for mutual cooperation. Participants from China and the two Koreas expanded on the theme of cooperation at the IT Exchange Symposium, sponsored by the Dalian Information Industry Association, Pyongyang’s State Software Industry General Bureau, and Seoul’s Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST). Dalian Alios Technical Consulting, a company run by Chinese Korean Yi Sung-nam, hosted the exchange (www.kotra.or.kr, 15 October, http://hanabiz.com, 9 October).

• Pyongyang opened, in April 2002 in Beijing, its first foreign exhibition of DPRK software products developed by Kim Il-song University, Korea Computer Center (KCC), PIC, and other centers of software development (DPRK Korea Infobank, 16 May 2002).

• KCC Deputy Chief Technician Kim Ki-ch’ol led a delegation of DPRK computer technicians to the World PC Expo 2001, held in September 2001 outside Tokyo. KCC has worked with Digiko Soft—a company run by a Korean resident of Japan—to develop commercial software. Through Digiko Soft, the expo was the first show in Japan “of computer software developed in [North] Korea” (Choson Sinbo, 22 October, 1 October 2001).

• KCC computer programmers Chong Song-hwa and Sim Song-ho won first place in August 2003 in a world championship software competition of go—an Asian game of strategy—held in Japan. KCC teams have visited Japan and China on at least eight occasions since 1997 to compete in program contests for go, taking first prize three times.

Gaining Access to Foreign Data North Korea has been acquiring foreign technical information from a variety of sources in recent years, benefiting from developments in technology, warming ties between the Koreas, and longstanding sympathies of many Korean residents in Japan.

Limiting Information to Technical Areas, Harnessing IT for Domestic Indoctrination and
Foreign Propaganda Development of the nation, rather than empowerment of the individual, appears to be driving DPRK efforts to develop domestic IT infrastructure and industry. Officials, scientists, and traders can now access and exchange information pertinent to their duties within the domestic Kwangmyong Intranet. Those with a “need to know” can even surf the worldwide Web for the latest foreign data. While Kim Chong-il reportedly watches CNN and NHK satellite broadcasts (Kin Seinichi no Ryorinin, 30 June) and supposedly surfs the Internet, the public has no such freedom to learn of the outside world without the filter of official propaganda.

Indeed, Pyongyang is using IT to indoctrinate the public and put its propaganda before foreign audiences. In addition to studying the party line through regular group reading of Nodong Sinmun in hard copy, a practice for indoctrinating members of work units throughout North Korea, the installation of computer networks now brings the newspaper to some workplaces on line, as the photograph below shows:
Moreover, Pyongyang has put its propaganda on the Internet.

Authorities have held the annual Pyongyang International Scientific and Technological Book Exhibition since 2001, bringing foreign vendors and organizations related to S&T publications to North Korea (KCNA, 18 August).

The Trade and Economy Institute, advertised as North Korea’s “sole consulting service provider” on international trade, has been exchanging information with “many countries via Internet” since September 2002 (Foreign Trade of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, 1 April).

According to PUST President Pak Ch’an-mo, who has extensive DPRK contacts in academic and scientific circles, North Korea has been purchasing technical books from amazon.com and from South Korea (Kwahak-kwa Kisul, 1 April).

Pro-Pyongyang Korean residents of Japan have long sent technical literature to North Korea.

ROK organizations, including PUST and IT publisher youngjin.com, have been donating technical publications on IT in recent years to DPRK counterparts as a means of earning good will and contributing to the eventual unification of Korea (Chonja Sinmun, 11 August). Cell Phones, Web Pages, and NHK Within North Korea, the advance of IT technology has been suggested by a number of recent developments:

Approximately 3,000 residents of Pyongyang and Nason have reportedly purchased cell phone service since November 2002 (The People’s Korea, 1 March).

Installation of a nationwide optical-fiber cable network in 2000, launch of the Kwangmyong 2000 Intranet the same year, and establishment of computer networks have made available domestic access to extensive technical databases maintained by the Central Scientific and Technological Information Agency, the Grand People’s Study House, and other repositories of technical information.

Via North Korea’s Silibank Web site (www.silibank.com), established in Shenyang, China, in September 2001, registered foreign users can exchange e-mails with DPRK members.

In August 2002, Kim Pom-hun, CEO of the ROK IT company Hoonnet.com, opened an
Internet café in Pyongyang, the only place in North Korea for the public to access the
Internet. Most customers of the service, which uses an optical cable linking Pyongyang
and Shanghai via Sinuiju, are foreign diplomatic officials or international agency
staffers; steep fees reportedly keep most Koreans from going on line (Wolgan Choson, 1
January).

Foreign guests in Pyongyang hotels have had access to foreign news broadcasts of
Britain’s BBC and Japan’s NHK since May 2003, according to a Japanese television
report (TBS Television, 2 September).

KCNA offers Pyongyang’s line in English, Korean, and Spanish at a Web site in Japan at
http://www.kcna.co.jp.

News and views of the General Association of Korean Residents in Japan and its
affiliated organizations appear on the group’s site at http://www.chongryon.com.

DPRK media, including newspapers Minju Choson and Nodong Sinmun, have appeared
on sites originating in China, such as http://www.dprkorea.com and http://www.uriminzokkiri.com

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RUSSIA HAS 2 BATTERIES CLOSE TO AL-LAQABAH – INTELLIPUS

The S-300 is mainly used in Eastern Europe and Asia although sources are inconsistent about which countries possess the system.

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RUSSIA HAS 2 BATTERIES CLOSE TO AL-LAQABAH – INTELLIPUS

has two separate batteries in place for S-400 SA-21 GROWLER strategic SAMs. One is located in the hills just west of Al-Laqbah.  April 8, 2018

Operators and other versions

Map with S-300 operators in blue and former operators in red

A S-300 of the Bulgarian Air Force

Russian S-300PMU2 during the Victory Day Parade 2009

The S-300 is mainly used in Eastern Europe and Asia although sources are inconsistent about which countries possess the system.

  •  Algeria– 4/8[89]battalions of S-300PMU2 were ordered in 2006
  •  Armenia– S-300PS (SA-10)
  •  Azerbaijanbought two S-300PMU-2/SA-20B SAM battalions in 2010
  •  Belarus– S-300PS systems delivered from Russia in 2007 to replace older S-300 model in Belarusian inventory.[93]Four divisions of S-300 missiles to be delivered in 2014.
  •  Bulgaria– ten S-300 launchers, divided into two units with five launchers each.
  •  People’s Republic of China– China was the first customer of S-300PMU-2.[16]China also built the HQ-15with the maximum range upgraded from 150 to 200 km (93 to 124 mi). The total number of the S-300PMU/1/2 and HQ-15/18 batteries in PLA are approximately 40 and 60 respectively, as of 2008. The total number of the missiles is well above 1,600, with about 300 launcher platforms.[96]Five such SAM battalions are deployed and in active duty around Beijing region, six battalions in Taiwan strait region and the rest in major cities like Shanghai, Chengdu and Dalian. Two Rif (SA-N-6) systems were purchased in 2002 for the Chinese Navy for the Type 051C destroyers. By 2011, it had obtained 15 battalions (4 systems) S-300PMU-2.
  •  Egypt– The S-300VM “Antey-2500” missile system was ordered in 2014, as part of a multi-billion Egyptian-Russian arms deal signed later that year. The $1 billion contract comprises 4 batteries, a command post and other external elements. In 2015, Russia started delivering the system components, Egyptian soldiers began their training in Russian training centers.[102]By the end of 2017, all batteries were delivered to Egypt.[ Russia is in talks with Egypt on the delivery of additional Antey-2500 systems.
  •  Greece[105]– S-300 PMU1 system acquired after the Cyprus Missile Crisisand operated by HAFon Creteconsisting of 1 Battallions/4 batteries/16 launchers / 80 missiles.[106]. Greece first fired an S-300 during the White Eagle 2013 military exercise, which was the first time it was used since it had been bought 14 years earlier.
  •  IndiaS-300air defence platforms (from Russia).[108][109]
  •  Iran– Originally purchased in 2007, Iran’s S-300 order was blocked until April 2015 when the Kremlin lifted its self-imposed ban on the sale due to international lifting of some sanctions against Iran. The country purchased and received an unknown number of S-300 (probably the S-300PMU2 system, a modified version of the S-300PMU1[110]) in 2016, it was fully tested and implemented in 2017. Iran received four S-300PMU2 batteries from Russia in 2016, each consisting of a 96L6E target acquisition radar, a 30N6E2 target engagement radar, and four 5P85TE2 towed transporter-erector-launchers (TELs). These systems are supported by two 64N6E2 battle management radars and linked using FL-95 antenna masts. Iran also owns an unknown number of a domestically produced Bavar 373, developed before the arrival of Russian S-300 system.
  •  Kazakhstan– 10 battalions after the refurbishment (PS – version)[113](2009 or later), 5 free of charge (2014),[114]and 5 free of charge (2015)
  •  North Korea
  •  Russia– All variations. Russian Air Defence Forces, (part of the Russian Air Force), /(1900 (S-300PT/PS/PMU, 200 S-300V/S-300V1 in 2010 year))[118]2000 in total launchers.[119]All production in 1994 (actually 1990) or older, all the complexes S-300PM have been repairing and upgrading (Favorite-S).[120]S-300P/PT have been retired before 2008, some S-300PS in service, but were to be retired in 2012–2013 Modernization of all version S-300P to the version S-300PM1 was to end in 2014. Resource of each taken increased by 5 years. PM 1 continued to version PM 2.[121]By 2015 S-300V4 was to have been delivered. Modernization of all S-300V to the version S-300V4 was to end in 2012.
  •  Slovakia– One battery S-300PMU and 48 missiles type 5V55R inherited from Czechoslovakia. 3 missiles were fired during exercise in Bulgaria in 2015.[124]
  •  Syria– Own, official government data – there in 2013 (literally – the individual components are placed),[125]a total of 6 was ordered, 1 (V family) has been sold in Egypt.[a]A battery of Russian S-300V4 air defense missile launchers has been transported to Syria, Russia’s Defense Ministry said in a statement. Its stated purpose is to defend a Russian naval base and warships.
  •  Ukraine– S-300PS, S-300PMU, S-300V and others. Only six systems have been repaired since 2004; as a result only 40% of Ukrainian S-300 systems were in good condition prior to 2014.[133]The crisis with Russiaresulted in a program of accelerated modernisation,[134]with at least 4 batteries overhauled in the period 2014-15. 34 launchers remained in the Crimeaafter its 2014 annexation by Russia.
  •  Venezuela– Ordered 2 battalions of S-300VM“Antey-2500”, delivered in May 2012.
  •  Vietnam– Bought two S-300PMU-1 for nearly $300 million.[138]and RLS 96L6 after 2009[129][139]Bought S-300 PMU-2 in 2012.
  •  Czechoslovakia– One battalion created in 1990. Passed to Slovakia in 1993.
  •  East Germany– Passed on to West German Army.
  •  Germany– Retired after re-unification.
  •  Georgia
  •  Moldova
  •  Turkmenistan
  •  United States– S-300P purchased from Belarus (1994). The system was devoid of electronics. S300V was purchased in Russia officially in the 1990s (complete set (except for 9S32 GRILL PAN multi-channel guidance radar)). Also acquired from Croatia.
  •  Uzbekistan

Cancelled

SOURCES: Wikipedia

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DNC hacker Guccifer 2.0 is reportedly a member of Russian military intelligence

 

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