The Rights of Animals in Islam

Ali Teymoori

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Australia Weighing ‘Extraordinary’ Powers to Identify, Disrupt Dark Web Cybercriminals

Legal experts urge caution as the government proposes new police powers for dark web takedowns, social media takeovers. Australian privacy, legal, and digital rights organisations have just weeks to comment on proposed federal legislation that would, among other things, let federal investigators take over suspects’ social media accounts as part of investigations into cybercriminal activity on the dark web.

Introduced last month by Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton, the proposed Surveillance Legislation Amendment (Identify and Disrupt) Bill 2020 (I&D Bill) introduces three new warrants designed to help Australian Federal Police (AFP) and Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission (ACIC) investigators to investigate and disrupt malicious online cybercriminal campaigns.

What the new warrants would allow

The new types of warrants outlined by the Department of Home Affairs include the data disruption warrant allowing investigators to access computers and “perform disruption activities [such as modifying, adding, copying, or deleting data on remote systems] for the purpose of frustrating the commission of criminal activity”.

The network activity warrant would allow AFP and ACIC officers to “collect intelligence” about criminal networks operating online, while the account takeover warrant would allow investigators to take over a person’s online account “for the purpose of gathering evidence of criminal activity”.

The new legislation, the government’s explanatory memorandum says, “addresses gaps in the legislative framework to better enable the AFP and the ACIC to collect intelligence, conduct investigations, [and] disrupt and prosecute the most serious of crimes” such as child abuse and exploitation, terrorism, and drug and human trafficking.

Although existing electronic surveillance powers are “useful for revealing many aspects of online criminality”, the memorandum says, they “are not suitably adapted to identifying and disrupting targets where those targets are actively seeking to obscure their identity and the scope of their activities.”

“On the dark web, criminals carry out their activities with a lower risk of identification and apprehension,” the memorandum says, noting that “many anonymising technologies and criminal methodologies can be combined for cumulative effect. … It is technically difficult, and time- and resource-intensive, for law enforcement to take effective action. … Without the critical first step of being able to identify potential offenders, investigations into serious and organised criminality can fall at the first hurdle.”

Australia’s increasingly intrusive laws raise concerns

Australian authorities have long invoked the spectre of online child abuse to justify increasingly intrusive laws in areas such as telecommunications data retention and the mandatory decryption of encrypted communications, as embodied in the troubled Telecommunications Legislation Amendment (Assistance and Access) (TOLA) Act 2018.

Between July 2018 and September 2020, Dutton said in his speech introducing the legislation, AFP investigations have led to 302 arrests and the removal of 229 children—including 113 in Australia and 116 overseas—from harm.

Despite this, the government’s Australian Centre to Counter Child Exploitation (ACCCE)—which has intercepted more than 250,000 child abuse files in the previous 12 months—had noted a 163% year-on-year increase in downloads of child-abuse material from dark websites during the June 2020 quarter. The AFP received 17,905 reports of child exploitation in 2018, with each potentially containing hundreds or thousands of images and videos.

“This bill will allow the AFP and ACIC to shine a light into the darkest recesses of the online world and hold those hiding there to account”, Dutton said.

Observers were quick to call for caution around the new legislation’s operation, with the Law Council of Australia warning that the “extraordinary” proposed powers provided unprecedented powers for authorities “to engage in offensive cyberactivities and online account takeovers.”

Law Council president Pauline Wright called for close examination of the stated operational case, criteria, thresholds, and process for issuance of warrants, and called for arrangements for independent oversight and review. “There must not be any repetition of the regrettable circumstances that led to the rushed passage of the TOLA,” she said, “where multiple post-enactment reviews of that legislation identified a need for major amendments to fix numerous, serious defects.”

An analysis by law firm Herbert Smith Freehills noted that Australia’s “complex web of overlapping regulations” was due for an overhaul in the wake of the recent Richardson Report, which concluded that the “undue complexity, and lack of inbuilt transparency and oversight” meant Australia’s intelligence-gathering legislation should be thrown out and completely rewritten.

“Even if the Surveillance Bill passes Parliament in its current form, it is likely that this will be further captured and refined as part of these reform processes,” the firm’s analysis noted. “This would be cause for significant concern amongst industry participants, and reinforces the need to engage consistently with the government consultation process in the coming years to ensure that the electronic surveillance legislation in Australia is appropriate, internally consistent and coherent, and adapted to the risks that it seeks to address.”

Submissions to the enquiry are due by 12 February, with Dutton asking the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Intelligence and Security to deliver its report by early March.

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The Military Would Not Participate in a Coup. Trump Can’t Understand Why….

Politicians from both parties have called on the armed forces to enforce election outcomes. The generals know better.

TheBulwark

The president of the United States considered using the military to overturn an election, according to press reports. Clearly, any president—any person—who would suggest such a thing doesn’t understand the whole point of American democratic politics. But more than that, the president clearly doesn’t understand the American military.

In the months before the election, there were concerns that Donald Trump might refuse to leave office. Some observers suggested that he might use his powers as the commander in chief to retain power. Others, including retired officers, pleaded with the military to enforce the will of the voters and remove him. Joe Biden saidback in June that he was “absolutely convinced” that the military would do so. Former Vice President Al Gore echoed him, as did some congressional candidates.

Since the election, Michael Flynn—retired Army general, Trump’s first national security advisor, a former lobbyist for the government of Turkey, recipient of a recent Trump pardon, and now a crackpot conspiracy theorist—has suggested that the president should invoke martial law (not “marshall law,” Senator Rubio, sheesh). How, in Flynn’s mind, martial law would prevent Biden from taking the oath of office or extend Trump’s term past its constitutionally mandated date of expiry is unclear.

First things first. Senior Defense Department leaders have already expressed that there is no role for the military in domestic political disputes. Gen. Mark Milley, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said as much in October—and repeated the point last week: “We do not take an oath to a king or a queen, a tyrant or a dictator. We do not take an oath to an individual. No, we do not take an oath to a country, a tribe or a religion. We take an oath to the Constitution.”

Secretary of the Army Ryan McCarthy and Army Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville also issued a joint statement on Friday that “there is no role for the U.S. military in determining the outcome of an American election.”

Granted, none of these three men is in the chain of command between the president and combat troops, but they all represent the view of the military, including the combatant commanders who are in the chain of command.

In the unlikely scenario that Trump were to issue an order to use the military to prevent the transfer of power, the order would go to the secretary of defense. In the unlikely scenario that the secretary were to decide to enforce the order (which, it should go without saying, would be illegal), he would relay the order to commander of the Northern Command, Gen. Glen VanHerck. There, VanHerck would consult with his team of legal advisers, who would inform him that the order was a grotesque violation of the Constitution, and VenHerck would refuse the order and send it back to the secretary of defense. Because, as Gen. Milley said, VenHeck’s loyalty lies with the Constitution, not a king or queen, and certainly not Donald Trump.

At noon on January 20, Biden will be sworn in as president, and the military will immediately recognize him as the commander in chief, even if Trump refuses to concede. Concession is not a constitutional requirement but a ceremonial act, and the transfer of power does not require it.

Americans need not worry about a military coup, and they certainly should stop asking for military intervention either to keep Trump in power or to remove him from office. If he refuses to leave the White House after Biden is inaugurated, he will simply be a trespasser and will be removed by the Secret Service (part of the Department of Homeland Security)—not the military.

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Chinese APT Group Linked to Ransomware Attacks

A well-known Chinese state-backed APT group is believed to have been responsible for multiple ransomware attacks against firms last year, according to new research. A report from Security Joes and Pro reveals how the vendors uncovered the links after investigating an incident in which ransomware encrypted “several core servers” at an unidentified victim organization.

They found samples of malware linked to the DRBControl campaign which targeted major gaming companies and is associated with two well-known Chinese-backed groups, APT27 (aka Emissary Panda) and Winnti. Specifically, they claimed to have detected an older version of the Clambling backdoor used in that campaign, an ASPXSpy webshell previously used by APT27, and the PlugX RAT which is often used in Chinese attacks.

Although Winnti is known for financially motivated attacks, APT27 is generally more focused on data theft. However, the latter has previously been linked to one ransomware attack, featuring the Polar variant.

“There are extremely strong links to APT27 in terms of code similarities and TTPs,” the report noted. “This incident occurred at a time when where COVID-19 was rampant across China with lockdowns being put into place, and therefore a switch to a financial focus would not be surprising.”

The attack itself does not seem to have been particularly sophisticated. The initial vector was a third-party service provider that itself had been infected by a third party, and the attackers used Windows own BitLocker encryption tool to lock down targeted servers.

ASPXSpy was deployed for lateral movement and PlugX and Clambling were loaded into memory using a Google Updater executable vulnerable to DLL side-loading. Popular open source tool Mimikatz was also used in the attack and a publicly available exploit for CVE-2017-0213 was used to escalate privileges.

Gaming firms are an increasingly popular target among financially motivated attackers, according to new research released yesterday by Kela. The threat intelligence firm claimed to have discovered one million compromised internal accounts from gaming companies on the dark web, and 500,000 breached credentials belonging to employees.

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Fake Covid-19 Vaccines are Flooding the Dark Web as Slow Vaccine Rollout Frustrates

Scams include emails promising entry to supposedly secret lists for early vaccine access and robocallers impersonating government agencies. Message boards on the so-called dark web have added Covid-19 vaccines to more traditional illicit goods for sale.

Covid-19 vaccine scams are on the rise, according to European and US government officials who are warning the public of fraudsters out for money and personal data. A Reuters search online, in dark web forums and on messaging app Telegram found seven different offers for alleged Covid-19 vaccines.

Scams include emails promising entry to supposedly secret lists for early vaccine access and robocallers impersonating government agencies. Message boards on the so-called dark web have added Covid-19 vaccines to more traditional illicit goods for sale. The US FBI and Interpol, among others, have warned of emerging pandemic-related fraud schemes, saying false cures and vaccines advertised on fake websites could pose cyber threats and a significant risk to peoples’ health, or even lives.

Website domains containing the word vaccine in combination with Covid-19 or coronavirus more than doubled since October to roughly 2,500 in November, when the first legitimate vaccines were nearing regulatory approval, according to cybersecurity firm Recorded Future, which is tracking Covid-19 fraud online.

“So far a lot of these domains just appear to be opportunistic registrations, but some are going to be used for phishing attempts to have people click on (malicious) links,” said Lindsay Kaye, director of operational outcomes at Recorded Future. Kaye said her team, which also scours the dark web, so far has not come across any legitimate vaccine diverted from healthcare facilities or national stockpiles.

The scams are preying on concerns about the far slower-than-promised rollout of vaccines to protect against the virus that has claimed more than 1.8 million lives worldwide so far. Most people will likely have to wait well into the spring, or even summer, to get their shot.

In the United States, only about 4.5 million people had received their first shot as of Monday, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported. That is a fraction of the 20 million who were supposed to have been vaccinated by the end of 2020, according to earlier government forecasts.

Vaccines, guns, and money

On dark web forum Agartha, fake Covid-19 vaccines were offered next to cocaine, opioid medication, “super high quality fake money,” hand guns and gift cards. Posts showed stock photos of vaccines and offered vials for $500 and $1,000, or the equivalent in Bitcoin.

On another dark web site, a seller claiming to be from the “Wuhan Institute of Science” offered Covid-19 vaccines in exchange for a donation, and asked buyers to provide their medical history. On Telegram, several channels claimed to offer Covid-19 vaccines, accompanied by stock images. One user offered supposed Moderna Inc vaccines for $180, and claimed the vaccine from Pfizer Inc and BioNTech SE could be had for $150 and AstraZeneca’s for $110 per vial.

Asked how the vaccines would be shipped, the account creator said they were transported in “regulated temperature packs” and ice packs within a few days, or overnight for an additional charge.

Actual Covid-19 vaccines, particularly the Pfizer/BioNTech offering, must be temperature controlled to remain effective, with drugmakers equipping shipments with temperature trackers to ensure the cold chain. Vaccine shipments and distribution are also tightly controlled by officials and will be administered at no cost.

The United States has so far authorized two CovidD-19 vaccines for emergency use – the ones from Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna. The European Union to date has authorized the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine and is expected to clear the Moderna vaccine this week.

The UK has already authorized those two and just added the vaccine developed by Oxford University with AstraZeneca. Asked about vaccine scams, Pfizer said it had taken meticulous steps to reduce the risk of counterfeiting and tracked trends very carefully.

“Patients should never try to secure a vaccine online – no legitimate vaccine is sold online – and only get vaccinated at certified vaccination centers or by certified healthcare providers,” a Pfizer spokesman said in a statement. Moderna referred a request for comment to the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), which did not respond. AstraZeneca did not respond to a request for comment.

The HHS, FBI and US Department of Justice have urged the public to report any Covid-19 vaccine scams, including people asking for out-of-pocket payments for the vaccine and online vaccine advertisements. 

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Think tank claims over half of 13L Indian soldiers under severe stress, deletes report later

More than half of the over 13-lakh strong Indian Army personnel “seems to be under severe stress”, according to a study published by the tri-services think tank United Service Institution of India (USI). There have been over 1,100 cases of suicide among varous ranks since 2010.

The study, done by a serving Colonel and published on the USI website last month was, however, removed Friday.

“Prolonged exposure of Indian Army personnel to CI (counter- insurgency)/CT (counter-terrorism) environment has been one of the contributory factors for increased stress levels,” Colonel A.K. Mor, senior research fellow at the USI during 2019-20, noted in his study.

The Army, the study further noted, lost more personnel every year due to suicides, fratricides and untoward incidents than in response to enemy or terrorist activities.

While sources in the Army have debunked the study due to its small sample size of just 400 personnel, they did admit that stress was an issue.

On 14 January last year, the USI had also organised a presentation by Colonel Mor on the topic ‘Occupational Stress in Indian Army Due to Prolonged Exposure to Counter Insurgency/ Counter-terrorism Environment’.

Welcome remarks were made by Maj Gen Rajiv Narayanan, head, Research and Centre for Strategic Studies and Simulation (CS3) at USI, followed by its Chairman, Brig Narender Kumar, SM, VSM (Retd) and distinguished fellow.

“The Director, USI suggested the scholar to focus on a selected sample size and diagnose the role and impact of stress on the unit,” the think tank had noted.

The study, which has now been completed, underlined that there has been a significant increase in stress levels among Indian Army personnel in the last two decades due to operational and non-operational stressors.

‘Stress management measures haven’t achieved results’

Talking about the steps taken by the Army and the defence ministry, the study also noted that various stress management measures implemented in the last 15 years “have not been able to achieve the desired results”.

It said that while operational stressors are well understood and accepted by Army personnel, non-operational stress factors are perceived as avoidable and resented against.

Indian Army officers, it added, experience much higher levels of stress as compared to the junior commissioned officers (JCOs) and other ranks (Ors).

Some of the major organisational causes of stress among Army officers have been identified as inadequacies in the quality of leadership, overburdened commitments, inadequate resources, frequent dislocations, lack of fairness and transparency in postings and promotions, insufficient accommodation and non-grant of leaves.

The main organisational stressors, as perceived by JCOs/ORs, were delay and denial of leaves, excessive engagement, humiliation by seniors, lack of dignity, zero error syndrome, unreasonable restrictions on the use of mobile phones, poor quality of ration and cooked food, besides lack of recreational facilities and conflict with seniors as well as subordinates.

However, the study added, “the overall job satisfaction and pride in uniform still remains high amongst JCOs/ORs. However, at the same time, it seems to be a growing matter of concern amongst officers, requiring urgent interventions from the highest levels of government”.

The study called for an institutionalised approach to stress prevention and management which should be treated “as a leadership role at Unit and Formation level.” The Print

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EU and UK Agreement for Exchanging and Protecting Classified Information

Article 9

For the purposes of this Agreement:
(a) all classified information released to the Union under this Agreement shall be sent through:
the Central Registry of the General Secretariat of the Council, if addressed to the European Council, the Council or the General Secretariat of the Council;
the Secretariat‐General Registry of the European Commission, if addressed to the European Commission;
the European External Action Service Registry, if addressed to the High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy or the European External Action Service;
all classified information released to the United Kingdom under this Agreement shall be sent to the United Kingdom via the Mission of the United Kingdom to the Union;
the Parties may mutually agree appropriate methods to ensure the efficient exchange of classified information, in accordance with the arrangements set out in points (a) and (b).

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Americans we lost in 2020

Illustration of baby in top hat sitting next to hourglass and holding calla lilies (State Dept./D. Thompson)
(Illustrations: State Dept./D. Thompson)

In recent days, many thousands of American families have faced holidays without loved ones who succumbed to COVID-19. Also in 2020 many notable Americans died — whether of COVID or another cause — who left an imprint on the world.

David Dinkins — the first African-American mayor of New York City, who died at 93 — had reshaped the U.S. political landscape. Actors Kirk Douglas (age 103) and Olivia de Havilland (104), two of the last surviving film stars from Hollywood’s Golden Age, brought romance and drama to movie screens around the globe. Country music legend Charley Pride (86), the first African American to achieve stardom in his chosen genre, and country/folk singer and songwriter John Prine (73), known for his wry lyrics about life and love, were among those lost to COVID-19. And the death of soul singer Bill Withers (81) was especially poignant as Americans had been posting online their own versions of his song Lean on Mein support of health care workers affected by the pandemic.

Illustration of John Lewis walking on bridge (State Dept./D. Thompson)

Here are 11 other Americans who died in 2020, all of whom led extraordinary lives.

Civil-rights icon John Lewis helped organize the 1963 March on Washington, and in 1965, he led marchers across Alabama’s Edmund Pettus Bridge in support of voting rights for African Americans. At the end of the bridge, he was attacked by state troopers, whose violence shocked the nation and hastened the passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act. Serving as a U.S. congressman from Georgia from 1987 to 2020, Lewis was revered as the “conscience of the Congress.” He died July 17 at age 80.

Illustration of Ruth Bader Ginsburg sitting and holding gavel (State Dept./D. Thompson)Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, an advocate for gender equality and women’s rights, was the second woman and the first Jewish woman to serve on the Court. After graduating at the top of her class from Columbia Law School, she ultimately became a leader of the Supreme Court’s liberal wing during her 1993-2020 tenure by authoring passionate dissents in numerous cases. In popular culture, she became known as the “Notorious R.B.G.” (a play on a rapper’s nickname), which she embraced. She died September 18 at age 87.Illustration of Eddie Van Halen holding guitar (State Dept./D. Thompson)

Guitarist Eddie Van Halen co-founded (with brother Alex) the band Van Halen, one of the most successful acts in rock-music history. At age seven, he emigrated with his family from the Netherlands to southern California, taking up the piano before mastering the guitar. A 2007 Rock & Roll Hall of Fame inductee, he combined a joyful stage presence with a technical virtuosity that made him the most influential guitarist of his generation. He was named the best rock guitarist of all time by Guitar World magazine in 2012. He died October 6 at age 65.

Illustration of Flossie Wong-Staal with microscope (State Dept./D. Thompson)Molecular biologist Flossie Wong-Staal was the first scientist to clone HIV and determine the function of its genes, a major step in proving that HIV causes AIDS. She also completed genetic mapping of the virus, which led to the development of HIV tests. Born in China, she was raised in Hong Kong and left at 18 to attend the University of California, Los Angeles, where she earned degrees in bacteriology and molecular biology. Her work, which was instrumental in introducing new treatments for HIV/AIDS patients, is now being used in the fight against COVID-19. She died July 8 at age 73.

Illustration of Chadwick Boseman in Black Panther costume with arms crossed in front (State Dept./D. Thompson)Actor Chadwick Boseman starred in the groundbreaking superhero movie Black Panther, which smashed box-office records worldwide in 2018. He brought strength and dignity to Black Panther as T’Challa, ruler of a fictional country in Africa. Marvel Studios will release a Black Panther sequel in 2022, but in tribute to Boseman, his role will not be recast. He previously played barrier-breaking icons such as baseball player Jackie Robinson in 42 and Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall in Marshall. He died August 28 at age 43.

Illustration of Chuck Yeager in uniform standing in front of plane (State Dept./D. Thompson)Test pilot Chuck Yeager became in 1947 the first pilot confirmed to have exceeded the speed of sound in level flight. Prior to breaking the sound barrier, he was a U.S. Army flying ace during World War II, at one point shooting down five enemy aircraft during a single mission. He later set several flight speed and altitude records, and his exploits paved the way for space exploration. Retiring from the military as a brigadier general, he was immortalized in Tom Wolfe’s book The Right Stuffand in a movie of the same name. He died December 7 at age 97.

Illustration of Frances Allen with laptop (State Dept./D. Thompson)Computer scientist Frances Allen, one of the few women in her field during the computer industry’s early years, performed pioneering research that laid the groundwork for today’s efficient, lightning-fast apps and other software for computers, smartphones and websites. For decades, she published landmark papers on compiler technology, the software that translates programs written by people into machine-language “code” that computers understand. In 2006, she became the first woman to win the A.M. Turing Award, known as the Nobel Prize of computing. She died August 4 at age 88.

Illustration of Tomie dePaola holding paintbrush and fountain pen (State Dept./D. Thompson)Author and illustrator Tomie dePaola, whose children’s books entertained several generations of readers, wrote or illustrated more than 270 books. Among them were his “Strega Nona” series, whose main character is a kindhearted “grandma witch” in Calabria, Italy, who uses her magic to help local townspeople. The first book in the series won a Caldecott Honor Medal in 1976 and was voted one of the “Top 100 Picture Books” of all time in a 2012 poll sponsored by School Library Journal. A recipient of many honors for his contributions to children’s literature, dePaola died March 30 at age 85.

Illustration of James Wolfensohn in business suit (State Dept./D. Thompson)Lawyer, investment banker and economist James Wolfensohn became known as a champion of the world’s poor, focusing on poverty alleviation during his 1995–2005 tenure as president of the World Bank. He also highlighted the problem of corruption in the area of development financing and carried out several other reforms at the Bank. Years earlier, the Australian-born Wolfensohn helped bring Chrysler Corporation back from the brink of bankruptcy, and he improved the finances of major U.S. cultural institutions, including the Kennedy Center and Carnegie Hall. He died November 25 at age 86.

Illustration of Little Richard at piano (State Dept./D. Thompson)Rock ‘n’ roll pioneer Little Richard, who drew heavily on the sacred (gospel music) and the profane (blues) to forge a distinctive rock style in the 1950s, was one of the first crossover Black artists whose music attracted fans of all races. Born Richard Penniman, he brought an uninhibited, manic energy to his performances and played a role in the formation of the genres of soul and funk. He influenced countless other artists, including James Brown and Prince, and was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 1986. He died May 9 at age 87.

Illustration of Christo standing by walkway (State Dept./D. Thompson)Conceptual artist Christo (full name: Christo Vladimirov Javacheff), born in Bulgaria, became famous for his massive, ephemeral public installations around the world. The artist, who used only his first name, spent decades wrapping iconic monuments and landscapes in billowing fabric — including Paris’s Pont Neuf and the islands in Miami’s Biscayne Bay. While Christo’s projects often sparked hostility in the art world, his work was popular, and he ensured that his (mostly self-funded) installations were free to the public. He died May 31 at age 84.

State Department, Staff writer Lenore Adkins contributed to this story.

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Was 5G Invented as a Militarized Weapon to Cause Organ Failure?

Is 5G based on weapon technology? A concerned reader sent in an email to idrop news suggesting that 5G was developed based on military tech that was designed to cause organ failure. Here are the facts.

Let’s put it this way. Telecom companies did not take military technology and adapt it to cell towers. Both technologies rely on the same radio-frequency spectrum, but they were developed separately and concurrently. The U.S. Air Force has been experimenting with millimeter wave since the 1980s, but it doesn’t work with the telecom industry.

It’s also important to note that the military’s Active Denial System is specifically meant to be a non-lethal weapon. Under normal conditions, it’s not meant to cause organ failure or any lasting damage (although, like most non-lethal weapons, the possibility for that is still present during misuse).

Active Denial System

But fear-mongering can spread quickly in the age of misinformation. Maybe you’ve heard of a 5G test in the Netherlands that allegedly caused birds to fall out of the sky en masse? According to independent fact-checking by Snopes, 5G testing did not cause those bird deaths — which aren’t altogether uncommon.

Again, there isn’t enough evidence that cellphones cause cancer. On the flip side, there’s not enough evidence to completely exonerate them, either. But the burden of proof doesn’t work that way. Still, conclusive answers are frustratingly hard to find.

For example, the World Health Organization classifies cellphones are a Class 2B carcinogen. That means they can possibly cause cancer in humans. But pickles and aloe vera are also Class 2B carcinogens.

And in the decade since smartphones have reached ubiquity, brain tumor rates have not been going up. Don’t take our word for it; take the National Cancer Institute’s.

This is all important to note because the level of radio-frequency exposure of 5G networks will be about the same as current 3G and 4G networks, Dr. Eric van Rongen, the Chairman of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection, wrote in an email to Snopes.

In other words, there just isn’t sufficient peer-reviewed scientific evidence to suggest that 5G millimeter wave is particularly dangerous. Of course, there needs to continual, independent research on the matter. But in the meantime, don’t freak out unnecessarily. – By Mike Peterson

Related articles

https://jnlwp.defense.gov/about/frequently-asked-questions/active-denial-system-faqs/

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Silk Way West Diplomatic Cargo Transportation of Dangerous Goods, Moved

Document preview

extracted from flight clearance request documentation 
Flight Date 
23/05/2017 
26/05/2017 
26/05/2017 
27/05/2017 
29/05/2017 
29/05/2017 
30/05/2017 
30/05/2017 
2/06/2017 
5/06/2017 
5/06/2017 
6/06/2017 
9/06/2017 
9/06/2017 
9/06/2017 
10/06/2017 
11/06/2017 
12/06/2017 
12/06/2017 
13/06/2017 
13/06/2017 
13/06/2017 
16/06/2017 
19/06/2017 
20/06/2017 
23/06/2017 
28/06/2017 
29/06/2017 
30/06/2017 
30/06/2017 
6/07/2017 

Flight No 
AZG 9532 
AZG 2124/5 
AZG 9532 
AZQ 4542 
AZG8801/2 
AZQ 4542 
AZG 9132 
AZG 2124 
AZQ 9532 
AZG 9452 
AZQ 4622 
AZQ 9532 
AZQ 9532 
AZQ 4142 
AZQ 4541/2 
AZQ 4542 
AZQ 4541/2 
AZQ 4542 
AZG 9452 
AZQ 9331 
AZQ 4118 
AZQ 4119 
AZQ 9534 
AZQ 9451/2 
AZQ 9531 
AZQ/7L 9335 
AZQ 4011 
AZQ 4013 
AZQ 9451/2 
AZQ 4015 
AZQ 4017 

Shipper 
Arsenal Co. Bulgaria 
Cherming Ordinance Inc. USA 
Arsenal Co. Bulgaria 
Gim Doo, Serbia 
Dunarit Corp, Bulgaria 
Gim Doo, Serbia 
CN Romarm SA, Romania 
Cherming Ordinance Inc. USA 
Yugoimport SDPR, Serbia 
Yugoimport SDPR, Serbia 
Elbit Systems Land & C4L Ltd, Israel 
Yugoimport SDPR, Serbia 
Yugoimport SDPR, Serbia 
German Military Forces 
Gim Doo, Serbia 
Gim Doo, Serbia 
Gim Doo, Serbia 
Gim Doo, Serbia 
Yugoimport SDPR, Serbia 
Arsenal Co. Bulgaria 
Swedish Armed Forces 
Swedish Armed Forces 
Dynarit Corp. Bulgaria 
Yugoimport SDPR, Serbia 
Dynarit Corp. Bulgaria 
Dunarit Corp, Bulgaria 
Culmen Intl LLC, VA USA 
Culmen Intl LLC, VA USA 
Yugoimport SDPR, Serbia 
Culmen Intl LLC, VA USA 
Culmen Intl LLC, VA USA 

Flight From 
LBBG (Burgas, Bulgaria) 
KJFK (Ney York, USA) 
LBBG (Burgas, Bulgaria) 
LYNI (Belgrade, Serbia) 
UBBB (Baku, Serbia) 
LYNI (Belgrade, Serbia) 
LROP (Romania) 
KJFK (Ney York, USA) 
LYBE (Belgrade, Serbia) 
LYBE (Belgrade, Serbia) 
LLOV (Ovda, Israel) 
LYBE (Belgrade, Serbia) 
LYBE (Belgrade, Serbia) 
EDDP (Leipzig, Germany) 
UBBB (Baku, Serbia) 
LYNI (Belgrade, Serbia) 
LYBE (Belgrade, Serbia) 
LYNI (Belgrade, Serbia) 
LYBE (Belgrade, Serbia) 
UBBB (Baku, Serbia) 
ESOE (Orebro, Sweden) 
ORER (Erbil, Iraq) 
UBBB (Baku, Serbia) 
UBBB (Baku, Serbia) 
UBBB (Baku, Serbia) 
LBBG (Burgas, Bulgaria) 
UBBB (Baku, Serbia) 
UBBB (Baku, Serbia) 
UBBB (Baku, Serbia) 
UBBB (Baku, Serbia) 
UBBB (Baku, Serbia) 

Flight Via 

Consignee 

UBBB (Baku, Serbia) 

LBBG (Burgas, Bulgaria) 

UBBB (Baku, Serbia) 

LYNI (Belgrade, Serbia) 
LYNI (Belgrade, Serbia) 

LBBG (Burgas, Bulgaria) 
ORBI (Baghdad Intl, Iraq) 
LBBG (Burgas, Bulgaria) 
LYBE (Belgrade, Serbia) 
LBBG (Burgas, Bulgaria) 

LYBE (Belgrade, Serbia) 

Afghan National Army 
Min of Interior, Iraq 
Afghan National Army 
MoD Saudi Arabia 
US Army, Indiana, USA 
MoD Saudi Arabia 
MoD Islamic Rep of Afghanistan 
Min of Interior, Iraq 
MoD Islamic Rep of Afghanistan 
MoD Islamic Rep of Afghanistan 
MoD Azerbaijan 
MoD Islamic Rep of Afghanistan 
MoD Islamic Rep of Afghanistan 
ISAF German Forces, Afghanistan 
MoD UK, Saudi Arabia 
MoD Saudi Arabia 
MoD UK, Saudi Arabia 
MoD Saudi Arabia 
MoD Islamic Rep of Afghanistan 
MoD Islamic Rep of Afghanistan 
Swedish Armed Forces, Iraq 
Swedish Armed Forces, Iraq 
Afghan National Army 
MoD Islamic Rep of Afghanistan 
Afghan National Army 
Afghan National Army 
MoD Azerbaijan 
MoD Azerbaijan 
MoD Islamic Rep of Afghanistan 
MoD Azerbaijan 
MoD Azerbaijan 

Flight To 
OAKB (Kabul, Afghanistan) 
ORBI (Baghdad Intl, Iraq) 
OAKB (Kabul, Afghanistan) 
OEPS (Prince Sultan, Saudi Arabia) 
KJFK (Ney York, USA) 
OEPS (Prince Sultan, Saudi Arabia) 
OAKB (Kabul, Afghanistan) 
ORBI (Baghdad Intl, Iraq) 
OAKB (Kabul, Afghanistan) 
OAKB (Kabul, Afghanistan) 
UBBI (Nasosni, Azerbaijan) 
OAKB (Kabul, Afghanistan) 
OAKB (Kabul, Afghanistan) 
OAMS (Sharif, Afghanistan) 
OEPS (Prince Sultan, Saudi Arabia) 
OEPS (Prince Sultan, Saudi Arabia) 
OEPS (Prince Sultan, Saudi Arabia) 
OEPS (Prince Sultan, Saudi Arabia) 
OAKB (Kabul, Afghanistan) 
OAKB (Kabul, Afghanistan) 
ORER (Erbil, Iraq) 
ESOE (Orebro, Sweden) 
OAKB (Kabul, Afghanistan) 
OAKB (Kabul, Afghanistan) 
OAKB (Kabul, Afghanistan) 
OAKB (Kabul, Afghanistan) 
LDRI (Rijeka) 
LDRI (Rijeka) 
OAKB (Kabul, Afghanistan) 
LDRI (Rijeka) 
LDRI (Rijeka) 

Weight(kg) 
24,336 
20,307 
42,084 
24,650 
90,000 
21,584 
96,699 
101,000 
53,568 
104,405 
46,908 
50,344 
65,960 
69,480 
1,662 
24,650 
1,662 
21,584 
104,405 
95,000 
287,408 
128,542 
105,000 
70,838 
105,000 
64,736 
41,430 
42,336 
70,838 
42,119 
41,700 

Weapons / Items Shipped 
Cartridges for weapons with bursting charge, grenades 
Cartridges for weapons with bursting charge 
Grenades, hand or rifle with bursting charge 
Cartridges for weapons with bursting charge (122mm HE Frag) 
Projectiles, detonating fuzes 
Cartridges for weapons with bursting charge (122mm HE Frag), grenades M75 
Cartridges for weapons with bursting charge (73mm HE Frag) 
Cartridges for weapons 
Cartridges for weapons (mortar shells 60mm) 
Cartridges for weapons with bursting charge (122mm HE Frag) 
SPG DANA MI-CZ Self-propelled Howitzer, other assorted armaments 
Cartridges for weapons (mortar shells 60mm) 
Cartridges for weapons (cartridge 23mm), ammunition incendiary (23mm) 
Aerial flares, igniters 
Cartridges for weapons (mortar shells 60mm, 81mm), grenades M75 
Cartridges for weapons (mortar shells 60mm) 
Cartridges for weapons (mortar shells 60mm, 81mm), grenades M76 
Cartridges for weapons (mortar shells 60mm), grenades M75 
Cartridges for weapons with bursting charge 
Cartridges, small arms (7.62), Grenades 40mm OG-7V HE/Frag 
Various materials (Paints, adhesives, fluids) 
ODD: Returns with similar manifest – Various materials (Paints, adhesives, fluids) 
Projectiles, detonating fuzes 
Cartridges for weapons with bursting charge 
Projectiles, detonating fuzes 
Cartridges for weapons with bursting charge 
Grenades, hand or rifle with bursting charge & Cartridges for weapons 
Grenades, hand or rifle with bursting charge & Cartridges for weapons 
Cartridges for weapons with bursting charge 
Grenades, hand or rifle with bursting charge & Cartridges for weapons 
Grenades, hand or rifle with bursting charge & Cartridges for weapons 

2,060 Tons transported between 23rd May and 6th July 

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